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Friday, December 28, 2012

Andrew Wyeth: The Observer's Eye


The works are stark, real and beautiful. They exist in something of an eternal state of winter and barrenness. The chill of the air, the sound of a slight wind blows through the leafless trees and the unfiltered light of the almost warmth less but sustaining sun reveals all. This land is drawn to the bare essentials and survival. The faces and character of the inhabitants reveal the austerity of this monochromatic place that must be worked; by all the inhabitants including the artist. There is nothing of adornment, nothing of the baroque in these works. The artist’s power of observation is great, his attention to detail immense and he is without rival. He; Andrew Wyeth is an artist for the ages. His works tell a tale of dedication and love of craft, of art and life.


In addition to landscape and still life, portraiture was among Wyeth’s favorite forms. He painted his neighbors religiously in the spirit of the “American Scene” artists. His love of sight and seeing was formidable and women were among his favorite subjects. Three of note were Christina Olsen, Siri Erickson and Helga Testorf. “Christina’s World” is in many ways his seminal work. It is included in the MoMA collection in New York and reproduced in countless books, magazines and was my introduction piece to Mr. Wyeth. It is magnificent! The young Christina is placed alone in the distance from her home in an expansive field. She is seemingly unable to walk in what appears to be a noon that could rapidly become twilight and night. Wyeth has masterfully painted the complexity of the foreground grasses and the distant buildings in equal manner without losing a feeling of depth. This is a great feat of painterly skill and invention.

The Helga series consists of 45 paintings and 200 drawings. The works were done in secret and it is safe to say Helga was his favorite single subject and devotion. Wyeth painted Helga from many angles and points of view, many are nudes. The Helga series was scandalous, entertaining and richly vibrant. Wyeth was thrust into the limelight of the mass media and for a time the world’s most talked about artist.

The Siri paintings are probably the least publicized but none the less beautiful and intriguing. They are much fewer in number than the Helga works. They are equal to the “Helgas” in technique and are visionary pieces.    

Wyeth has not been universally loved and appreciated. It is the curse of popularity to be derided by some. He has been accused of being an over glorified illustrator.  His father was the great N.C. Wyeth who essentially home schooled his beloved son “Andy” after recognizing his incredible possibilities as an artist/draftsman. Wyeth was a child prodigy; one that lived up to and surpassed his youthful potential. His works are of the sort that the viewer can become lost in, transported to a place of unequaled skill, achievement and grace. He was and is the Best.

Slected From the Artist's Portfolio












Wednesday, December 26, 2012

The Best of Days



We have enjoyed another incredibly blessed and wonderful Christmas. It is indeed “the Best of Days.” We celebrate the birth and gift of our lord and savior Jesus Christ; the son of God, Emmanuel. Our individual and collective celebrations take on many forms and it is so much bigger than a single day. It is a season; a continuing season that we still embrace, enjoy and cherish even as I write this blog. The Hallelujah Chorus, the card in the mail box, the trimming of the tree, Santa and the “Merry Christmas Greeting” accompanied with smile from a stranger are all equal parts. We give freely in every way and the joy is in seeing the happiness on the face of those we give to. Such a reward and treasure are these and countless other things of this immaculate time of year. The word; priceless is the only response to these moments to which we are immeasurably thankful. Among the greatest pleasures of life is Christmas. It has been so for generations and will continue without end. 



Filling stockings

Trimming trees

Children praying on their knees

 

Gifts and giving

Ancient ways

Christmas is the Best of Days

 

This particular Christmas Season; regretfully has had many sad notes. Our hearts go out to all as we pray for God to grant the strength, heart, character and faith to endure their terrible misfortunes. The sorrows and losses to befall so many this year seem unbearable. A better day is coming and their spirits will be renewed.

 

Thank you Christmas! This year we needed you even more!

Saturday, December 15, 2012

Favorite Christmas Carols


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVbOukTa0r4   

 
Music is a major part of our Christmas Holiday.  We hear Christmas carols and songs everywhere during the season. We each have our personal favorites that we know and enjoy every year. We sing them with joy, heart and spirit. I have envisioned some of the favorites and most familiar tunes here in cartoon form. You can guess the titles and then check your answers by clicking on the link below each image for a video and musical solution. After the video click on the back arrow to return to this page and try another image. ENJOY and have a Happy, Healthy, Completely Remarkable, and Wondrously, Enjoyable Christmas!!!      
www.youtube.com/watch?v=QON0ck15Tfw&list=FLii0I79wn_BU5_CKWInAhtQ&index=12


www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESHZbPiJxJ0&list=FLii0I79wn_BU5_CKWInAhtQ&index=13





Saturday, December 1, 2012

A Magnificent Zen Story and Film


 
Did you ever own a “View-Master” as a child and did you love it? Essentially everyone I asked this question answered… “Yes and yes.” With that reference established I proceeded to tell them about the glorious screen adaptation of Yann Martel’s novel “Life of Pi.” The opening credits sequence of this film will return you unexpectedly to that time of total engagement and wonder, to the visually enhanced world the “View-Master” gave us. Within the same emotionally rich feeling the toy drew us into we find ourselves experiencing those same emotions again as we view this film.  The visuals are so compelling, so rich they could exist simply on their own as works of art without a story line or plot. They are that good! There are many scenes through the course of the film that rival museum masterpieces in depiction, depth and composition. This is to the glory and grandeur of Lee’s film that illustrates the limitless possibilities of the emerging medium and technology of 3D. Until now the domain of the “Tech-Boys” the release of “Life of Pi” marks a giant step forward into the realm of the visual arts. Ang Lee (the artist supreme) has crossed into legend with this peace and surely the best from his oeuvre is yet to come. For the moment we have “Life of Pi;” see it, enjoy and be enraptured. 
 
 

 
 
The world of Pi is also envisioned as much more than mere tranquility and beauty. It is brutal and frighteningly realistic. There are many discomforting scenes and times when the dangerous; potential man-eater feels literally at the viewer’s throat and you will find yourself wanting to escape the danger. There are moments of pulling back into your theatre seat and genuine dread. I know of no other film to accomplish such a feat in such a disturbing and alarming way. It is a fantastic thing of amazing dimension.


 
In short Pi is a young boy who finds himself alone on a life boat with an untamed Bengal Tiger named Richard Parker. Pi’s father was the owner of a zoo in India who for economic reasons leaves with his family by ship to make a fresh start in Canada. The ship sinks in a terrible storm; Pi’s family is lost, Richard Parker and Pi survive. The life boat, the ocean, the tiger and God are all that remain to Pi. Survival and faith are Pi’s dilemma and salvation. The telling of this Zen story is multi-layered and intricate. 
 
 
                   
 
Thematically Pi and the tiger’s story is one that has been told in many forms and countless versions. There are reminders of Kipling’s “Jungle Books” and Defoe’s “Robinson Crusoe.” Only Blake’s “Tyger” captures the power of the beast more dramatically and poetically.  This effort is universal in appeal as it searches for answers to eternal questions. The journey will reflect on your personal vision of life as you drift at sea with the unlikely pair of castaways. Stories of this nature will always be fresh, moving and entertaining; “Life of Pi” is in line of becoming a classic, an exceptional extravagance. The journey of pure survival and into the self is taken every day in less fearful and dramatic but equally meaningful ways. We share this bond with Pi. Ang Lee’s film making and the writing of Yann Martel come together in a thing of perfection. It is ours to enjoy as we return to an age of wonder.